Showing, not telling: a sensual taste experience

.

‘Sweet 100’ cherry tomatoes are ripening and I can’t resist plucking one from the vine and popping it into my mouth. My tongue teases the curves and presses them into submission. Warmed by sunshine the globe bursts into juices that dribble off my chin and give my taste buds visions of Tuscany.

There’s no resemblance to the meek store-bought varieties that do nothing more than garnish a salad. No, this rich scarlet morsel explodes with all the fulfillment of summer’s nurture, provoking my taste buds and enticing me to tug another from the vine.

I see a writing application emerging – demonstrating the difference between telling you that these tomatoes taste good, and showing you the sensual experience of eating them. Mmmm. 😉

Now it’s your turn. How else could you describe their taste, or the taste of another favourite food? Give it a try!

~

“Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father.”
[James 1:17a KJV] 

~

Finding the words to show, not tell

.

“There is nothing more difficult for a truly creative painter than to paint a rose,
because before he can do so he has first to forget all the roses that were ever painted.”

[Henri Matisse]

Description, we’re told, is best achieved not in telling, but in showing — not in saying it’s raining, but in helping the reader feel raindrops on his face. (Who said that, BTW?) If Henri Matisse thinks painting a rose is difficult, he should try describing one! That God can even create such perfection leaves me without words.

How about you? Could you write a sentence or two that would allow readers to experience the fragile blush, the satin texture, of this beauty?

~

Ah, Sovereign Lord, you have made the heavens and the earth by your great power and outstretched arm. Nothing is too hard for you.”
[Jeremiah 32:17 NIV]

~

Expressing Emotion

A new week. A new month. No more winter Olympics to preoccupy me. <sigh>

.

This Olympic experience wasn’t what I expected. The anticipated enthusiasm was replaced by something so much greater. Television cameras continuously scanned the faces of both athletes and spectators. There was exhilaration, jubilation and euphoria. And I cried in shared pride.

.

After THE hockey game Vancouver’s downtown filled with 150,000 revellers who didn’t set fire to garbage bins or break windows but danced and sang in the streets, hugging and high-fiving perfect strangers who shared their elation. And I cried again.

.

There was so much emotion. I felt it, but it’s hard to describe in words.

.

That’s true in real life, and also in our writing. We don’t use descriptive words to express emotion in our novels… or do we? Isn’t “show, don’t tell” supposed to apply?

🙂 😀  😦 😮

How do you express emotion in your writing?

.